COQ10 - and hypertension
{{returnGenderDisplayName('F')}}, 41
58d***
{{returnGlobalDate('2016-12-30T18:33:46-0800')}}
Hypertension runs in my family and I want to take preventive measures, if possible. If I want to use COQ10, should it be combined with any other minerals or supplements to make it more effective?
  • Answer 1
    • Dr. Haddit Godoy Coto
      {{returnGlobalDate('2016-12-30T18:50:48-0800')}}
      Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a substance similar to a vitamin. It is found in every cell of the body. Your body makes CoQ10, and your cells use it to produce energy your body needs for cell growth and maintenance. It also functions as an antioxidant, which protects the body from damage caused by harmful molecules. CoQ10 is naturally present in small amounts in a wide variety of foods, but levels are particularly high in organ meats such as heart, liver, and kidney, as well as beef, soy oil, sardines, mackerel, and peanuts.
      
      Coenzymes help enzymes work to digest food and perform other body processes, and they help protect the heart and skeletal muscles.
      I don't recommend it for prevent High blood pressure but It is said to help heart failure, as well as cancer, muscular dystrophy, and periodontal disease. It is also said to boost energy and speed recovery from exercise. Some people take it to help reduce the effects certain medicines can have on the heart, muscles, and other organs.
      
      You can prevent high blood pressure by:
      
      Maintaining a healthy weight. Being overweight can make you two to six times more likely to develop high blood pressure than if you are at your desirable weight. Even small amounts of weight loss can make a big difference in helping to prevent and treat high blood pressure.
      Getting regular exercise: People who are physically active have a lower risk of getting high blood pressure -- 20% to 50% lower -- than people who are not active. You don't have to be a marathon runner to benefit from physical activity. Even light activities, if done daily, can help lower your risk.
      Reducing salt intake: Often, when people with high blood pressure cut back on salt, their blood pressure falls. Cutting back on salt also prevents blood pressure from rising.
      Drinking alcohol in moderation, if at all: Drinking too much alcohol can raise your blood pressure. To help prevent high blood pressure, limit how much alcohol you drink to no more than two drinks a day. The "Dietary Guidelines for Americans" recommends that for overall health, women should limit their alcohol to no more than one drink a day.
      Reduce stress: Stress can make blood pressure go up, and over time may contribute to the cause of high blood pressure. There are many steps you can take to reduce your stress. The article on easing stress will get you started.
      
      Other nutrients may also help prevent high blood pressure. Here's a roundup of the research:
      
      Potassium. Eating foods rich in potassium will help protect some people from developing high blood pressure. You probably can get enough potassium from your diet, so a supplement isn't necessary (and could be dangerous without a doctor's oversight). Many fruits, vegetables, dairy foods, and fish are good sources of potassium.
      Calcium. Populations with low calcium intakes have high rates of high blood pressure. However, it has not been proven that taking calcium tablets will prevent high blood pressure. But it is important to be sure to get at least the recommended amount of calcium -- 1,000 milligrams per day for adults 19 to 50 years old and 1,200 mg for those over 50 (pregnant and breastfeeding women also need more) -- from the foods you eat. Dairy foods like low-fat milk, yogurt, and cheese are good sources of calcium. Low-fat and nonfat dairy products have even more calcium than the high-fat types.
      Magnesium. A diet low in magnesium may make your blood pressure rise. But doctors don't recommend taking extra magnesium to help prevent high blood pressure -- the amount you get in a healthy diet is enough. Magnesium is found in whole grains, green leafy vegetables, nuts, seeds, and dry peas and beans.
      Fish oils. A type of fat called "omega-3 fatty acids" is found in fatty fish like mackerel and salmon. Large amounts of fish oils may help reduce high blood pressure, but their role in prevention is unclear. Taking fish oil pills is not recommended, because high doses can cause unpleasant side effects. Most fish, if not fried or made with added fat, is low in saturated fat and calories and can be eaten often.
      Garlic. There has been some evidence to suggest garlic’s effect in lowering blood pressure, in addition to improving cholesterol and reducing some cancers. Further research is being conducted to fully assess garlic’s potential health benefits. I hope these information was helpful
    • {{returnGenderDisplayName('F')}}, 41
      58d***
      {{returnGlobalDate('2016-12-30T19:00:39-0800')}}
      Okay but Inhave been researching a long time and the article, "Coenzyme Q10 to treat and prevent heart disease" from the British Journal of Cardiac Nursing - Aug. 2015, Vol. 10 Issue 8, p382-387 author: David Mantle...
      
      Q-Symbio study (44% improved) and Kisel-10 study... kiesel study states to use Selenium with COQ10 (54% improved) and that is what i am curious about...do you know more?
    • Dr. Haddit Godoy Coto
      {{returnGlobalDate('2016-12-30T20:09:08-0800')}}
      Base on  British Journal of cardiology : 
      
      Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a naturally occurring vitamin-like substance that has three functions of relevance to cardiovascular function: (i) its key role in the biochemical process supplying cardiac cells with energy; (ii) its role as a cell membrane protecting antioxidant; (iii) its direct effect on genes involved in inflammation and lipid metabolism. Although some CoQ10 is obtained from the diet, most is manufactured within the liver, the capacity for which declines with age.
      
      October 2015Br J Cardiol 2015;22:160doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.037	Leave a comment
      
      You can take 100mg at day combined with Selenium to prevent heart disease include Hypertension because Q10 is an antioxidant how protects cardiac cells and reduce Inflammation
    • {{returnGenderDisplayName('F')}}, 41
      58d***
      {{returnGlobalDate('2016-12-30T20:11:08-0800')}}
      Okay, so you dont know of the other minerals that work to enhance it or you say it is only selenium? 
      
      Is there another type of doctor Inshould talk to - are there such doctors as "mineralists" or would I need to skip doctor altogether and talk to a chemist?
      
      Thanks!
    • Dr. Haddit Godoy Coto
      {{returnGlobalDate('2016-12-30T20:19:24-0800')}}
      There are some studies from Other nutrients may also help prevent high blood pressure. can Like Potassium Calcium and Magnesium too if you want to talk with a cardiologist or maybe a biochemical maybe they have new papers or research reviews 
      
      Potassium. Eating foods rich in potassium will help protect some people from developing high blood pressure. You probably can get enough potassium from your diet, so a supplement isn't necessary (and could be dangerous without a doctor's oversight). Many fruits, vegetables, dairy foods, and fish are good sources of potassium.
      
      Calcium. Populations with low calcium intakes have high rates of high blood pressure. However, it has not been proven that taking calcium tablets will prevent high blood pressure. But it is important to be sure to get at least the recommended amount of calcium -- 1,000 milligrams per day for adults 19 to 50 years old and 1,200 mg for those over 50 from the foods you eat. Dairy foods like low-fat milk, yogurt, and cheese are good sources of calcium. Low-fat and nonfat dairy products have even more calcium than the high-fat types.
      
      Magnesium. A diet low in magnesium may make your blood pressure rise. But doctors don't recommend taking extra magnesium to help prevent high blood pressure -- the amount you get in a healthy diet is enough. Magnesium is found in whole grains, green leafy vegetables, nuts, seeds, and dry peas and beans.
      Fish oils. A type of fat called "omega-3 fatty acids" is found in fatty fish like mackerel and salmon. Large amounts of fish oils may help reduce high blood pressure, but their role in prevention is unclear. Taking fish oil pills is not recommended, because high doses can cause unpleasant side effects. Most fish, if not fried or made with added fat, is low in saturated fat and calories and can be eaten often.